12 March 2014

My First Knitting Project!


Guys! I knit something! (Knitted? Knit?... [quick google later]... "Knit" is fine.) A scarf, to be precise. And just in time for Spring - erm... good work me!


I'm rather proud of my first knitting project. There are a few dodgy bits, as evidenced by the photo above - including one area where, looking at it now, I guess I must have stopped a few stitches into a row, got distracted, and started knitting back the other way. Nice one! I only actually noticed when I looked at this photo though. Dodgy bits are part of a knitting project's charm, non?

I really enjoyed making this project. Learning a new skill feels so rewarding, and it's exciting to be right at the beginning when I don't know anything... I don't even know what I don't know. I got the same feeling working on this scarf as when I made my first ever dress - I had no idea what I was doing, but loved the anticipation of achievement. The thing that bothers me though is the same thing that bothered me when I began sewing (and which I'm trying to rectify with my patterns) - why oh why are knitting patterns so difficult to understand?!


To help me decipher this whole new mystery world of knitting, I got my mitts on this book, Learn to Knit Love to Knit, written by Anna Wilkinson and published by Quadrille. It's seriously gorgeous, packed full of lovely, colourful projects, including some beautiful jumpers and polka dot socks, as well as tips on getting started. (In fact, seeing this book was one of the reasons I went with Quadrille for my own book!)

The only thing is, seeing as spring is around the corner, I don't really feel like making a wooly hat or wrist warmers as my next project. What does one knit for spring/summer? In London? That's easy-ish? And nice? I've been hunting through Ravelry, and naturally, I have my eye on some tops of the striped - one might even say "Breton" - variety - including this, this and this. (Let's face it, you always need a jumper in London in the Summer.) No idea whether they are achievable on my very limited skills, but I'm always up for a challenge. I've also discovered the wonderful designs of Andi Satterlund. This lady designs absolutely beautiful knitting patterns that are right up my proverbial street, and has great taste in pattern names to boot (she's got a Mathilde hat and a Miette cardigan!). They look like they might be a bit too ambitious for my next project though. Anything else you can suggest that I might like to make next?

Thanks for your help!


[Soundtrack: 'Prince Johnny' by St.Vincent]

94 comments:

  1. Knitting's great, and a portable project! I'm soooo slow at it though, so it takes me an age to finish anything. I've just bought one of Andi's patterns - Hortencia. Just waiting for my yarn to arrive and at my rate, I may be done in time to wear it for winter. Ysolda has some great patterns: http://ysolda.com/patterns/ I say go ambitious - best way to learn!

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    1. Ooh lurrvely, thanks for the link!

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  2. I wouldn't attempt wrist warmers as only your second project because you'll need to do it on 4 needles to avoid seams. I'd get in a bit of practice first. Try doing something with a bit of shaping so you can start learning the abbreviations, if you have someone expecting a baby or with a small child then doing a baby hat or a small jumper is a great way to learn without it taking too much time. Plus if a baby hat, that will only take a few nights to knit goes horribly wrong you haven't lost much time. Debbie Bliss does some lovely things for kids.

    If you want to do something for yourself that looks amazing (and is actually much easier than it looks) you could try a technique called entrelac. I made this for my mum http://knittymummy.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/entrelac-scarf.html using the technique.

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    1. Your entrelac shawl looks gorgeous!! Thanks for the link to the pattern!! Pati x

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  3. I just learned to knit this January too, and since then I've been completely addicted! I'd work on something in the round next, like a hat. That will give you the skills to master round-shaped things, like sweaters! Also, hats are nice because they are smaller projects, so you get instant gratification.

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  4. Well done on your first knitting project!! I agree with Kathy Bee about baby projects. Although you will have a good idea about construction already as it's similar to sewing, so I say just dive in! If it goes wrong it can always be ripped out. I have my eye on some Andi Satterlund patterns too, but I absolutely loved the shawl Lynda was wearing on The Bee last night. After some Twittering, I found the pattern. Just need to finish a cardigan first!

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  5. The bit where you've turned round midway is actually a bit of short row shaping which is a bone fide knitting technique, and not one normally used on a first project!

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    1. Hahaha! Of course, it's what I meant to do... ;)

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    2. I was going to congratulate you on reinventing short rows but I see Mariana got there first. Instead I shall relate what we in the knitting community say, 'it's not a mistake, it's a design element!'

      Also, don't be afraid to just try stuff in knitting. My very first project as a carefree teen knitter was a hideous 1980's mohair jumper, which wasn't exactly the easiest thing to start with. But I didn't know it was meant to be hard so I just cracked on and made it. Anyway, what's the worst that can happen? If you really stuff it up, you can just rip it back and either restart or reuse the yarn for something else.

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  6. Hilarious photo … looks like you've been attacked by a yarny seamstress eating monster!

    Do persevere with the knitting though, whereas sewing is all about speed you need to develop a much more r-e-l-a-x-e-d attitude when knitting. Oh, and it's a lot easier to curl up on the sofa with a knitting project than a sewing one! ;-)

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  7. thanks for the book recommendation, i've been wanting to learn. so maybe if i start now i'll be on to sweaters by the time winter rolls around again? haha one can dream!

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  8. I'd go with either baby clothes for the summer, or maybe a summery cardigan. Doing something lacy is always good because it gets you familiar with the different ways of increasing an decreasing. Something like this maybe: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/glacier-stole

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  9. Tilly, I'm so glad you've been turned to the dark side! ;-) Mwa ha ha ha ha

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  10. Tilly, you could SO make a Miette as your first garment, seriously. I have only ever knitted long straight things such as your scarf above (lovely colours by the way!) but kept reading about how easy the Miette was to knit up. I decided to take the plunge at the beginning of February and have slowly been working my way through the pattern using YouTube videos, blog knit alongs (Gail from Today's Agenda and Johanna from Making It Well have been excellent resources of information) and advice from the lovely sewing bloggers on Instagram! You can do it! I've bodged up bits of the lace work, so all I'd advise is to not work on it whilst watching some gripping telly programme or when you're tired otherwise it's very easy to mess up! Like you say though, it's part of the charm. :)

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  11. I live in JA, and I love to knit, but... no scarves for me... headbands, berets (with 'lacework' to get some air through there), bags are my go-to projects. I have seen folk do bathing suits in crochet, and I suspect they can be knitted as well, but I have had no reason to look it up. Maybe you will? :-)

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    1. I was watching a TV programme about the history of knitting (which was ace, BTW) and a brave lady demonstrated going into the sea wearing a knitted bathing suit... Needless to say it was more than a bit saggy when she emerged - yikes!

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  12. Definitely have a go at Miette! It looks like a good beginners project that you can get good wear from afterwards. Nothing worse than finishing a knitted garment you know you'll never wear! Failing that, how about a picnic blanket made up of stocking stitch squares? Easy peasy and you can carry little bits to knit wherever you up!

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  13. Congratulations!! It looks lovely! I just knit my first sweater, and it was so thrilling, and also frustrating. I'm with you on it being difficult to get going, and you don't know what you don't know. I've heard good things about Miette for a beginner cardigan. I'm thinking about trying it soon, too.

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  14. I only really knit in the winter, something quite comforting about having a woollen project on your knees when it's cold outside. Really struggle to keep it going when the warmer weather hits, but keep going and well done on the scarf, cute colours.

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  15. I also vote for Miette! It's funny because when I started deciphering patterns I was totally lost like you. I think it's too many abbreviations that you don't associate with any stitch so you lose it. The I took a class and went over each and every Miette abbreviation. The instructor would teach me how to make that stitch and we would go on. Eventually it all came together. I also watched tutorials by Gail of Today's Agenda. Now it seems much easier to understand the instructions...let me tell you Italian knitting instructions are a lot worse ;o)

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  16. I have to congratulate you for persevering Tilly, because garter stitch scarves can be so time- and yarn-consuming! As for next projects, I'm a huge advocate of just picking something you love the look of and going for it. Anything you pick is going to teach you at least one new skill, and because it's something you really want to have or to try, it will keep you encouraged if you get stuck or feel slow. My only caveat is that if you have any perfectionist tendencies like me, you might want to steer clear of anything too complex not because it's hard, but because you don't want to end up feeling like you didn't do the pattern justice and then not wear the finished knit. Can't wait to see what you knit up next!

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    1. That sounds like great advice, thank you!

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  17. I've been knitting, and I just started sewing! My first scarf looks like yours too, but it gets easier. As for the next knitting project, I suggest something in DK or worsted weight, so it goes a little faster, and I prefer in the round, rather than in pieces. That means you usually just knit and don't purl.

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  18. Hey, you did 'short rows' knitting without even realising!!!

    I'm not going to recommend anything. The thing with knitting is that you can knit anything you want to - just learn how to interpret the pattern code and how to knit that new-to-you stitch when you get to it.

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  19. Hey Tilly, well done on the scarf! I know it's the wrong time of year, but when I taught myself to knit I found that making hats was an ideal way of practising really useful skills, especially increasing and decreasing, but on a small project so you get that sense of satisfaction quicker! I'm knitting Ysolda's Blank Canvas jumper at the moment and I reckon that would also be an ideal beginner project if you wanted something bigger, the shaping on the body is absolutely divine: ysolda.com/patterns/blank-canvas Her instructions are super-clear, and you could easily make it stripy!

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    1. I just saw that pattern - looks great!

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  20. Congrats on your first knitted project! Will you be taking the knitting world by storm now, too?? :)

    For spring projects, one major factor is yarn - I would use cotton instead of wool, which will make projects more breathable. There a lots of cute and simple sweater projects out there. Here's a fun one - the lace looks harder than it is! It's actually a fast a fairly easy knit: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/titaniaem/lacy-ribwarmer

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    1. Cotton yarn - noted. There's so much I don't know!

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  21. Wow, I'm seriously impressed!! No honestly, I really am!! When I tried to knit the simplest of simple scarves it had loads of holes in it at random intervals. I was only about 10 years old though, maybe I should give it another go?! x

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  22. I like you have a strong background in sewing, but had never learned to knit until last fall when I took a class through community ed (I teach sewing at the same school). My first project was a cowl pattern I created with a seed stitch it knits up in a day with one skein, I have the pattern for free on Ravelry under my blog name OhYouCraftyGal, but I'm assuming you'd want something more seasonal. I'd suggest making some simple household items like pot holders, coasters, a throw in cotton maybe, pillows, etc. Or if you want to make a fashion item maybe you could make spring/early fall accessories out of cotton with either a lace pattern or using big needles. Hope this helps!

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  23. The salt city cardi on ravalrey!

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  24. Yay! Congratulations on your first knit! It's really beautiful! After some practice, knitting patterns will become easier to decipher. I can't wait to see what you make next! You can absolutely make a sweater as a beginner. As long as you know how to knit and purl, you basically know it all!

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  25. Well done! I love the colours you chose for this. Now you've fallen down the Ravelry hole you'll be there a long time! You've probably already discovered how easy it is to while away hours there.

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  26. I don't knit but I did the exact same thing on my first crochet scarf! At some point I went in the wrong direction halfway through a row, I still don't understand how that could have happened. I used the double crochetstitch with very bulky yarn so the mistake was very obvious and I could easily unravel it but it made me feel pretty stupid for a moment. Good to know I'm not the only one this happens to.

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  27. I just finished up the miette cardigan, and if you're willing to take it slow and watch u tube videos as needed for new techniques, you could totally do it, even as a beginner. If that feels too daunting, I'd recommend making a cropped shrug, maybe out of cotton-blend yarn. There are lots of patterns out there that are basically an extra wide scarf shape knitted up and then sewn together from each end to make sleeves. They're a good way to get into a rhythm of knitting and learning to read patterns, and don't usually take to much time or yarn.

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  28. Mistakes in knitting is technically termed "improvisation"! I knit socks - lots and lots of socks (nearly 50 pairs, in fact!) so that's what I'd recommend, especially on a circular needle as they're sooo easy - but you may want to practice on something else first. Ravelry really is a good starting point, although as Sam said, you'll lose days in there! I don't see what's wrong with going for something fairly ambitious as long as you know that it'll take you a while - knitting something you really want to wear is the biggest incentive for finishing it. And YouTube can show you just about anything you need to know if you get stuck. Good luck!

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    1. That sounds great, thank you for your advice!

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  29. Yo Ho Ahoy! I warn you now, delving into other crafts is a slippery slope...I began knitting and have ended up adding crochet, sewing and screen printing to my repertoire. While this may not seem like a bad thing I am constantly drowning in a sea of unfinished projects...in terms of suggestions, given your obvious natural skill at short row shaping, these slippers (http://www.wintersdayin.ca/2010/03/graceful-slippers-knitting-pattern.html) are a nice quick knit (and who doesn't love a bit of instant gratification). They also use short row shaping and eyelets so a few extra skills in the bargain. I will say the pattern does require a small degree of deciphering but you can do it, knitting patterns are like a foreign language when you begin but pretty quickly you'll be C3F...ing with the best of them. Good day to you...

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    1. My "talent" for short row shaping was just bursting to make itself known! ;)

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  30. In fact, I hope you don't mind me posting this, but my latest blog post is all about my hand knitted socks - just in case I can tempt you to try! :-)

    http://winwickmum.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/the-joy-of-socks.html

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  31. I made miette as my first knitted garment and I promise you you can do it :) I even co-hosted a knitalong (you can find it on my blog through my name), with heaps of help for beginners along the way. Also I have to caution you about the learn to knit book. I got sucked in by its pretty presentation but the pattern I tried was written really badly. I don't recommend this book! I'm going to post my project from it soon but it had a lot of issues. Glad you are enjoying knitting. I'm really hooked!

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  32. Very sweet scarf! :) Well done on finishing your project! I'm just learning to move on from scarves myself, am about to attempt an Owls sweater (by Kate Davies). Looking forward to seeing what you work on knit-wise next.

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    1. I LOVE the owls sweater! It's what I'm aiming for...

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    2. Owls is actually surprisingly easy, and would be very little problem for a confident beginner. All you need is to be able to knit and purl, increase and decrease - everything else is basically a variation on that and YouTube can help you there. You don't even need to pick up stitches for the sleeves because of the owl yoke.

      And because it's chunky wool, if you make a mistake and have to unravel a few rows, you don't lose hours of work! (It's one of the things I quite like about knitting - if you make a monumental mistake it's not the tragedy it can be with sewing.)

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  33. Feel the fear and knit it anyway!
    I knitted my daughter an icelandic jumper. I have a lovely vintage knitting book which has some lovely short sleeved jumpers 'perfect for town or country'
    The favoured wool seems to be 3ply which seems to have fallen out of fashionmAny knitters know a good place to get or any good alternatives?

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    1. You're probably best looking on Ravelry (www.ravelry.com) for yarn alternatives. My Grandma used to design knitwear and most of her garments were in 3ply, but you don't see it around much at all these days.

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    2. Thank you. I'll take a look.

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  34. Knitting is so much fun! And I adored that book! And Andi Satterlund's designs are great! (I'm even wearing my own Miette right now!) Whoops, maybe an overload of exclamation marks... But what can I say, I absolutely looooove knitting.
    And if you're looking for something to knit for spring/summer, try an ajour sweater. All the little holes will make sure you're progressing quickly :)

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  35. I just started knitting also. I'll be posting my first clothing make soon! Good job and I agree on the patterns being kind of confusing!!

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  36. How about something like a bandana cowl, or a bowtie scarf? They're small, so you won't spent ages on the next project, and they're a quick way to try out some new techniques for shaping (if you want to move on to making garments) and/or stitch patterns (if you want to practice producing different kinds of fabric). You can make them in cotton or silk (or something thrilling like sea cell) for a cooler fabric. A few links:
    http://www.purlbee.com/beginners-knits/
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/bowtie-2
    http://www.purlbee.com/the-purl-bee/2011/10/11/sweet-stitching-with-erin-bandana-cowl.html
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/anthro-inspired-scarflet

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  37. (Take two: I got an error message the first time I commented. Please disregard if I'm commenting twice)

    Great job on your first knitting project! I always find that knitting is a seasonal hobby for me. I just don't like the feel of the yarn in my hands in the hot summer months and there's no cold weather driving an urge to make something snuggly. I found that home decor items were great projects when I was learning to knit because they don't require any fitting - bowls, pillows, even plushies! If you're set on knitting a garment though, maybe a sleeveless sweater? A simple sleeveless pullover can be as easy as knitting two big rectangles! Good luck!

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  38. Make a citron! http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/citron

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  39. Ohhhh it is lovely!!!! I am currently working on my first pair of socks, and finished the first one earlier this week!
    -Lauren
    musingsofaflowerchild.com

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  40. My first-ever sweater was Anna Wilkinson's raglan sweater, and I continue to get tons of comments from people who don't even know that I knit it! It was a great beginner sweater because it's essentially just 4 flat pieces that you knit and then seam together.... Best of luck in your knitting adventures. I hope you'll post more knitting projects on your lovely blog!

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  41. A great first start for knitting are Stefanie Japel's Craftsy knitting classes. Personally I've never been able to understand to drawn instructions in books, videos are so much better. She explains many stitches, heck my first knit item was her lacey scarf, and many great tips. I think it's an excellent basis and you'll be able to tackle anything after that. Also make sure to check the free short rowes/grafting classes, they're awesome too. Anything Craftsy is worth the money and during sales the beginner knit classes are only $10-15.

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  42. Hey Tilly- congrats on your first knitting project! It's onwards and upwards from here- once you've mastered the basic knit and purl you can do just about anything!
    If you don't fancy a Miette, the Hetty pattern also by Andi (love her so much!) is pretty simple although it looks really complicated. It only takes a couple of new stitches to learn (which aren't too difficult either if you watch a couple of videos on them) and you've got a wonderful, intricate cardigan. Although if you want to start off even simpler and get your head around creating something with curves before adding in a stitch pattern (totally understandable!) then you could try Andi's salt but omit the lettering and the pockets. There are, of course, other completely plain cardigan patterns but I love the way Andi's patterns are written, some commercial brands don't give a lot of explanation, very similar to what we experience in the world of sewing patterns too!
    Good luck with whatever you choose to do- the great thing about knitting is you can undo a mistake (not like running fabric through an overlocker!) so don't be afraid to jump right in!

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  43. Hi Tilly! Love the colors! If you are looking for other patterns that may be more seasonal, check out the knitty magazine (http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEss14/index.php) that published online for free every season!

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  44. Congrats on your first knitted garment! Tin cans has released a simple knitting collection for beginner knitters, and its all free! http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/search#sort=best&query=tin%20cans%20%2B%20simple%20collection
    I taught myself to knit mostly with YouTube, its awesome for any terms you don't understand (I find the pictures in books difficult to understand). Good luck!

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  45. Yay for your knitting and congrats on your first scarf. As a knitter who sews, I'm always so happy to see sewists learning how to knit. Sharing the love!

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  46. Great work! I say be fearless and selfish - none of this baby clothes business! The Jo Sharp sideways rib jumper is cute, easy, varied sleeve lengths and body length, designed for cotton yarn and has a lovely boat neck and 3/4 sleeve option - it's definitely in my Rav queue....

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  47. I haven't knit anything in ages. The last scarf I knit ended up being about 3 meters long. I just sat in front of tv and knit away sometimes changing the colours I used. When I realized how much I really had knit I was just laughing at myself. Who knits 3 meters long scarves? Silly me.
    Try to use different designs/patterns as well, it's fun to create all those snowflakes, flowers, etc with different colours. :)

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  48. Great scarf! I always say that once you can knit and purl, you can knit anything - all the other stitches/techniques are just variations on that. Definitely just pick something you like the look of, often things turn out to be nowhere near as daunting as you expect. The great thing about ravelry is there are often groups made by the designer/fans where you can ask for help, and looking at other peoples' projects is great for finding out what they found particularly good/bad. For something very wearable nearly all year round, how about some felted slippers? These ones are really very simple, very cute, plus felting is quite a lot of fun!
    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hopsalots

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  49. To be the first you has been great ... I love the color combination.

    uVe
    http://uvedeveronica.blogspot.com.es/

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  50. Well done Tilly, it looks lovely! I agree with the other comments, knit something that you really like, that way you'll keep motivated. No point knitting something just for the sake of it and getting bored half way through. I'd maybe just avoid socks/ anything knit on four needled at the very start as it takes some getting used to. I've just been drooling through the links in the comments - so many ideas for my next projects too! I see someone else spotted Lynda's gorgeous rainbow shawl on the Sewing Bee too! Good luck with your next project Tilly and please keep us posted!

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  51. Epic work, lady! Learn to Knit, Love to Knit is what got me knitting last year. It's fantastic!

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  52. Ah you see Tilly, you have to knit in the Spring what you would like to wear in the Autumn and knit over Christmas what you would like to wear in Spring - that is how it works little lady!! I am currently knitting a school cardigan for my girl when she starts school for the first time in September and I am crocheting a blanket for a wedding present in August. Jo xx

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  53. I love knitting! It gives you an excuse to sit by the TV and do it too! This is really good for a first project and really well knitted. Mistakes are what gives something it's charm! Looking forward to seeing your next project! XxxX http://thesecondhandrose.blogspot.co.uk

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  54. Very crazy :)
    I have a similar one. If you want to see -> http://baforiasdiy.blogspot.sk/2014/02/strikovany-sal.html

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  55. I've just realised that I've been knitting for about 10 years now but I still think of myself as a beginner so I can remember pretty much everything I have made. Don't rush in to using cotton as certain yarns can be quite splitty, and that's irritating when you're trying to get to grips with instructions. If you can buy in a shop then they would be able to advise on a good cotton yarn for a beginner but online you could look for something with a blend of cotton and wool : some of the modern knitting "superstores" have great filtering by fibre, colour, weight etc so you can narrow down something to your preferences and budget (and you can get self striping yarns which is practically Breton style ready to fall off your needles).

    My first product after plain rows like your scarf was a pair of mittens; I dropped a few stitches and had a bit of trouble with the increasing, but they are wearable, were quick to achieve, I've still got them, and with a pretty yarn and maybe a little embellishment afterwards will be as satisfying as anything else. Being as it's spring but could still cold for months, fingerless mitts are great for typing and crafts and there is much less shaping involved. Knitty has some great tutorials for sewing up with mattress stitch.

    Another project you might like is the shawl Dream Stripes. I've made this recently and found the lace edge a bit of a challenge, but you could easily just finish with a simple crochet edge (look at Attic24 for crochet inspiration) or look up the Feather and Fan lace pattern - it's very simple, and very effective. The reason I mention this is because on Ravelry there are several Dream Stripes done in navy and white or cream; some of them with a red edging; which look great and might suit you for the strong colours and Breton theme.

    And finally : don't forget on Ravelry you can narrow your searches with ratings of "happiness" and "difficulty" - so when I look for a new project I look for one that lots of people have made (less need to worry about mistakes in the pattern); lots of people are happy with the finished product (so it's probably wearable, and good value for your time); and that people rate as very or fairly easy (I know it's good to be challenged, but it's nice to know whether a project is likely to be achievable before you start).

    Sorry to have wittered on but I remember vividly what it is to be excited by the prospect of knitting and not know what to do next so I hope this helps. And the pink and blue look great by the way - it reminds me of this plant, whose name I always have to look up but whose appearance is unforgettable! - http://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/clerodendrum-trichotomum-var-fargesii/3367.html

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  56. Hey Tilly, I jsut started knitting recently too! Your scarf looks great!
    If you want to take your skills up a notch, you might try a beanie or a beret - I made this one (http://crafts.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-knit-a-simple-beret-with-a-cable-brim--craft-14317) as my second knitting project and it was really quick (1 week) to make! I thought this project was well balanced between being easy and allowing you to learn new stuff (knitting in the round, cables, increases and decreases).
    I've just started one of Andi's patterns (Hortencia, here on Ravelry : http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hortencia) this week...I'm eager to see how it turns out!

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  57. I definitely think you should jump straight in at the deep end! Ysolda's patterns are lovely and my first garment was her Coraline cardi. I also also recommend Veera Valimaki - beautiful simple shapes with lots of colour and stripes!

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  58. My first knitting project was a little bit like that, with some mistakes, but that is normal! I love your blog by the way. So inspiring!

    Ana Valls - Coco Wawa Crafts
    https://beta.folksy.com/shops/Avallsgo

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  59. What about a Hot water bottle cover??? I know it sounds crazy at this time of the year but they can be lovely in the winter...and a short and satisfying project. (check Aneeta Patel Knitty Gritty book for a pattern). I find that I prefer to crochet in the autumn/ winter and a bit in the spring but in the summer I find the wool too much... so I do paper piecing hexie sewing as it is portable and this year, finally more sewing with your Coco and your soon to be published book...yay!! Pati x

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  60. Go with what you like! I'm currently knitting the miette cardigan pattern and it's relatively simple so far. I think it's appropriate for a beginner.

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  61. Such a pretty scarf. I was also trying to learn to knit this winter, but it was mor difficult, than I expected. Must try again next winter...

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  62. Welcome to the knitting party! I love hearing that people are learning to knit. You should definitely check out Ravelry.com for free patterns!

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  63. Love it, the little mistakes are all part of the charm of the project :) Starting off with a scarf is a great idea.

    I do find that my enthusiasm for knitting does dip a bit this time of year and as I often start things in the winter, I do find I end up finishing things just in time for summer!! Hmmm. Dolike to have a project on the go tho, am currently knitting this jumper:

    http://surfjewels.tumblr.com/post/73533376947/knitting-progress-so-no-mishaps-for-a-while

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  64. Well done, you've also inadvertently taught yourself a technique - where you've started a row then turned and knitted back is a 'short row' - used to increase for shaping. I love your blog, the tutorials are really useful, thank you

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  65. Hi Tilly, I've been knitting for about 3 years now (my first project was a 4m long Doctor Who scarf, definitely taught me the patience that is needed for knitting!), and I would recommend choosing smaller projects to start off with, such as a beret or a hat. Also check out Tiny Owl Knits on ravelry, they have some very cute bunny slippers that are quick, and teach you more about increasing and decreasing the number of stitches. Good luck!

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  66. Love it Tilly! I learned to knit last year and can't stop. If you haven't already, go check out Loop in Camden Passage, near Angel Station Islington... whenever I went in I'd come out with wonderful inspiration and beautiful yarn no matter what season it was. The ladies inside are so helpful for beginners and will even help you sort out mistakes. They also write a great blog that I read as often as I read yours! http://www.loopknitting.com/

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  67. Andi Satturland's designs are great, and usually knitted in one piece, so there's no finishing, and her patterns are really spelt out. But after one scarf, i would not jump straight to a sweater. And don't make the mistake of staying with the bulky yarns - they do lead to quick results, but are so unwieldy to knit that they make things seem more difficult. I would never have imagined years ago that I would prefer working sport and 4ply yarns, but i have gotten to that stage.... Anyway, basically, I would now try something on 5 - 6mm needles - not so thin that it takes forever, not so thick that you have to manoevre! Maybe a cute beret or hat - on straight needles, and sewn up - and later on you can try them with circulars.

    And for summers - well you have more choice in the UK than in my hot island! I use linen and cotton for summer knits, but even a 4ply sleeveless cotton top in one of kim Hargeaves designs is too hot here in August. In the UK you can use a light wool/cotton mix for a little cardi eventually. Join Ravelry and look for the Anthropologie capelet - it's in a bulky yarn, but you can find versions of it in thinner yarns too - very cute free pattern for a cropped cardi knit in one piece with no seams. Very simple:).
    And when you eventualy get to knitting a stripey sweater, try to make a raglan sleeved top down one. So much easier than trying to match up seams, beleive me.

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  68. Lovely looking scarf, even if you won't get to wear it for a while. I've never been able to knit a scarf, even as my first project, as I get bored easily. I like to have a bit of change every once in a while. Having said that I'm currently working on the round neck sweater with raglan sleeves from Anna's book in a lovely grey colour. 108 rows of stocking stitch to make up the back is a lot of stocking stitch and I'm about to repeat it to make up the front! I was hoping it would be a nice spring jumper, it's made with DK wool so not too thick, but I don't think I'll finish till mid-summer! It's turning out to be a very good pattern for a first "big project" and you already have the pattern!

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  69. Great scarf Tilly. There are some great patterns here to try http://www.vogueknitting.com/free_patterns.aspx

    Verity

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  70. It's beautiful! Do you know right after I saw your first post on knitting, I went out and bought some bright pink yarn and taught myself to knit? Mais oui, the the little "mistakes" just add to the charm.

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  71. It's definitely 'knitted' and not 'knit'!

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  72. Hi Tilly,

    in my family we have always used the terms knat/knatted for finished knitting because we are strange and it amuses us! I really like those colours next to each other and they way the scarf looks when you wrap it around. You could try looking at Knitty Gritty which is an excellent beginners knitting book. Loads of great project ideas too :) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Knitty-Gritty-Knitting-Absolute-Beginner/dp/0713685425/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394847518&sr=8-1&keywords=knitty+gritty

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  73. Tilly, here are two fairly simple jumper patterns that you could make and wear in the spring/ summer:

    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/-xia-summer

    This one is very simple and only has some yarn overs and some increases (I didn't need them in mine, I think you might find yourself in the same situation), but the end result is rather lovely.

    The other one is slightly more complex and the waistband is knitted in the round, but if you're looking for a challenge, you will get the most beautiful summer top out of it. I knitted one for my mother last year and have been dying to knit one for myself since:

    http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/nachtfalter

    If either of those takes your fancy and you feel like you'd like to give them a try, there are multiple forum posts about both, and if you need any one-on-one help, don't hesitate to message me via Rav, I'm izz there.

    Good luck!

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  74. I'll make a deal with you! Knitting support for you...if you'll help me sew. I'm based in central London!!!

    I'm only half joking.

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  75. I like to knit in the evenings as it is more sociable than disappearing into my workroom to sew plus, if you have a straightforward pattern, you can watch a film at the same time. These days, YouTube is an invaluable source for help with the different methods and stitches. I have just taken to knitting socks and I followed loads of tutorials online - just like having a personal tutor but one you can pause and rewind :)
    Good luck with it.

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  76. I just remembered some more lovely knitting patterns by Quince & Co - I've never made one of theirs but they look lovely! http://quinceandco.com And I've just been to the Selvedge Spring Fair where I saw these guys http://www.stitchandstory.com

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