15 June 2016

Fabric Shopping for the Marigold Jumpsuit and Trousers

Fabric ideas for the Marigold sewing pattern - Tilly and the Buttons
Thank you SO much for your incredible response to the Marigold sewing pattern! Lexy is packing your orders at lightning speed. We're so glad you love the jumpsuit and trousers pattern as much as we do :)

One of the most enjoyable parts of making your own clothes is choosing a fabric that makes your heart melt. Which is exactly what we're going to talk about today!

Inspiration for sewing the Marigold jumpsuit and trousers

First, some Pinspiration. I've been having fun starting the Marigold Pinterest board. We look forward to showing off your handmade creations on that board soon, but in the meantime I've added some jumpsuit and peg trouser pics made in different fabrics help inspire your creations.

When making your own Marigold jumpsuit or trousers, look for light- to medium-weight drapey fabrics, such as viscose (or rayon), silk or poly crepe de chine or very drapey lightweight chambray. I wouldn't make it in fabrics such as crisp woven cottons or heavy denim, for example. Drape is key - you want the fabric to hang fluidly, not stand stiffly.

You could also sew the trousers in a lightweight jersey with very little stretch. I say lightweight because I tried them in a heavier sweatshirt fabric and they looked awful!! Lightweight would be much better with the elasticated waistband and the pocket layers. And very little stretch because if it's stretchy, gravity could pull down the fabric to create gaping pockets and a saggy bottom (noooo!).

Marigold jumpsuit and trousers sewing pattern - Tilly and the Buttons
Marigold jumpsuit and trousers sewing pattern - Tilly and the Buttons

We made the model's jumpsuit in Platinum Luxury Crepe from Plush Addict. The trousers were made in a viscose rayon from Sew Over It (now sold out, sorry) - viscose is such a lovely fabric, as it feels a bit like a soft cotton but has a beautiful fluidity to it.

Here are a few things we've found around the internet that we think would be lurrrrvely as a Marigold jumpsuit or trousers (I had to hide my wallet while compiling this post!). Please bear in mind that we haven't personally handled all these fabrics ourselves, just think they sound suitable from the descriptions - so if you want to be on the safe side, best order a swatch before getting a huge long piece...

 

Clockwise from top left:



Clockwise from top left:



Clockwise from top left: 


Clockwise from top left


Clockwise from top left: 

How much fabric do you need?

If you're making the trousers and your measurements fall into size 1 - 4 on our sizing chart (approx UK 6 - 12), you'll need:
  • 1.5m (1 5/8 yards) if the fabric is 150cm (60in) wide
  • 1.8m (2 yards) if the fabric is 115cm (45in) wide
  • 2.2m (2 3/8 yards) if the fabric is 115cm (45in) wide and has a directional print
If you're making the trousers and your measurements fall into size 5 - 8 on our sizing chart (approx UK 14 - 20), you'll need:
  • 1.7m (1 7/8 yards) if the fabric is 150cm (60in) wide
  • 1.9m (2 1/8 yards) if the fabric is 150cm (60in) wide and has a directional print
  • 2.5m (2¾ yards) if the fabric is 115cm (45in) wide
If you're making the jumpsuit and your measurements fall into size 1 - 4 on our sizing chart (approx UK 6 - 12), you'll need:
  • 1.9m (2 1/8 yards) if the fabric is 150cm (60in) wide
  • 2.3m (2½ yards) if the fabric is 115cm (45in) wide
If you're making the jumpsuit and your measurements fall into size 5 - 8 on our sizing chart (approx UK 14 - 20), you'll need:
  • 2.1m (2 3/8 yards) x 150cm (60in) wide
  • 3.2m (3½ yards) x 115cm (45in) wide

Little tip - I keep a 'Fabric shopping' note on my phone where I'll write, for example, "Marigold - 1.9/2.3". If I happen to find myself in a fabric shop (ahem), I can quickly see that I need 1.9m if the fabric is on a narrow bolt, 2.3m if it's wider.

You'll also need:
  • Marigold sewing pattern!
  • Matching thread
  • Iron-on interfacing – similar weight to your fabric
  • Your waist measurement in 2cm (3/4in) wide elastic
  • Large safety pin
  • If you're making the jumpsuit (not the trousers): 17-18cm (7in) invisible zip
  • Sewing machine and basic tools, including an invisible zip foot and zip foot or adjustable zip foot
Marigold jumpsuit and trousers sewing pattern - Tilly and the Buttons

What fabric are you going to use for your Marigolds? I'd love to see what fabric you pair with the pattern (I'm nosey like that) - tag us on Instagram @TillyButtons #SewingMarigold if you share a pic!

Happy fabric shopping!

6 comments:

  1. I made a skirt recently from the Freespirit Rayon from The Splendid Stitch and can vouch for it... it would wonderful in some marigold trousers... mmmmmmm

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Tilly! I love your patterns and am an enthusiastic newbie sewer. I'm trying out your pattern soon and wanted to ask - my calves are pretty huge and I'm worried they won't fit into the Marigold pattern (I'm making the pants only). I read your post on adjusting the pattern but didn't see anything about calves. Do you have any advice on this, or what the calf width is for the largest size of this pattern? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi runnybabbitcrafts! Marigold isn't super slim fitting so there's a good bit of ease to accommodate for different leg shapes. If you're worried you can always grade from a larger size at the lower leg, to the trouser size you choose at the hips - it's the same process as grading the bodice side seams

      The calf width at size 8 is about 47cm - Does that help?

      Delete
  3. Hi, I bought some fab sparkly black fabric to make the marigold jumpsuit but I need to line it so that you can't see my underwear. Any tips on how to approach this?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ooh a sparkly jumpsuit sounds lovely! The easiest way to line it would probably be to "underline" it. Basically you'll need to find something nice and floaty and lightweight that would add too much bulk or body to the fabric. Cut out the bodice and trouser pieces in the lining fabric too and tack (baste) the edges to the edges of the main fabric, close to the raw edge. Then you can treat the double layers as one.

      I hope this helps!

      Delete

Feel free to chip in! Please don't comment anonymously though - you can leave your email if you don't have an OpenID. Comments on older posts are moderated for spam so won't show up immediately.