10 August 2016

A Lemons Clemence Skirt – And How to Line It

A Lemons Clemence Skirt - Tilly and the Buttons

It seems like an eternity away now, but at the start of the Summer I went on holiday to the Italian Amalfi coast – the land of ginormous lemons, lemon trees everywhere, and basically everything made with lemons. So I decided now was the time to dust off this lovely cotton voile that had been waiting patiently in my fabric stash for the right occasion.

Before you ask, the fabric sold out aaaages ago after my friend Jane made a gorgeous Kate Spade-inspired dress in the same print. Sorry! But if you’ve seen something similar, do share in the comments :)

Clemence skirt - easy sewing project from Tilly and the ButtonsClemence skirt - easy sewing project from Tilly and the Buttons


Immediately I could see this fabric's potential as a full skirt worn with a stripey top (naturally), so whipped up a speedy Clemence skirt. The instructions to make your own are in my book. At the last minute I decided to add a black exposed zip instead of an invisible zip at the back, to give it a more modern look. It’s not the neatest exposed zip I’ve ever inserted as it was such a late addition, but I’m pleased with the general result all the same!

Clemence skirt - easy sewing project from Tilly and the ButtonsThe fabric is slightly see-through so I added a lining in some cheapo viscose I’d bought to make toiles with. We sometimes get emails asking how to line the Clemence skirt. What I did was:

1) Cut the lining pieces to the same width as the skirt pieces, only a couple of inches shorter – leaving off the hem allowance and making it a bit shorter still so it doesn’t peep out under the bottom of the skirt.

2) Stitch the lining pieces together at the side seams. Trim and press the seam allowances open (there's no need to finish them unless they're fraying heavily, as they'll be hidden). Then finish the hem with an overlocker (serger) – or you could zigzag stitch it or fold under the ends twice and topstitch it.

3) Once you've sewn the skirt pieces at the side seams, but before attaching the waistband, pin the top edge of the lining to the top edge of the skirt, the wrong sides facing each other, matching seam lines and notches. Tack (baste) them together using a 10mm (3/8in) seam allowance.

You can then treat these two layers as one and sew the rest of the skirt as normal.

Clemence skirt - easy sewing project from Tilly and the Buttons

Sorry I don’t have any pictures of the steps (sometimes it’s just nice to sew for fun without thinking about writing up instructions!), but hopefully you can see how the lining and skirt are attached in the photos above.

As well as ensuring I don’t flash at random strangers, the lining also makes the skirt puff out a little bit more than otherwise. I felt very glam wearing it!

Amalfi Coast - Italy


Have you done any holiday sewing recently?

17 comments:

  1. 'Oranges and Lemons said the Bells of St Clemence' - you missed a trick there! Lovely skirt, I might try this pattern now I've seen it made up :)

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  2. Skirt looks sooo awesome. I like the fabric so much =)

    My blog

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  3. Dinara May has some fabrics on Spoonflower that might meet that lemon/fruit need: http://www.spoonflower.com/profiles/dinaramay

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    1. Oh wow, those designs are soooo cute! Love the peaches too.

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  4. Fab! The minute I saw the photo I thought of Gretchen Hirsch's lemons on cotton sateen: http://www.blogforbettersewing.com/2016/03/spring-2016-gertie-fabrics.html

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    1. Ooh great, thanks for sharing that link!

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  5. Think I will make this skirt. I shall look for some fabric with an Autumnal theme.

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  6. Gorgeous skirt...I'll definitely be having a go! x

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  7. Such a lovely summery skirt, I like the fun print and it looks great on, think I need to make another as my last one is now too big.

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  8. Thank you! I feel my third Clenence skirt is on its way with lining. Ciao.

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  9. Thank you! I feel my third Clenence skirt is on its way with lining. Ciao.

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  10. Very nice and I have seen this fabric several times and often wondered what I would make with it, now I see its perfect for a skirt.

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  11. I'm adoring the lemons! The skirt is gorgeous and so beautifully made, the lining is impeccably inserted. Thank you for all the insight into how you made this and lucky you for having such a gorgeous holiday! XxxX

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  12. As someone new to skirt lining, would this generally work for other skirts?

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    1. It depends on the skirt, but should be fine for lots of projects. Take a look at this skirt lining method too :)

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