12 April 2017

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

Sewing buttonholes is one of those techniques that many beginner stitchers try to avoid… but once you get to grips with them, buttonholes are honestly pretty straightforward! Plus it’s a great skill to have under your (handmade) belt, as it opens up a whole world of shirts, blouses, dresses, skirts and more.

In this post I’m going to take you through sewing four-step buttonholes on a mechanical sewing machine. Check out my post of making one-step buttonholes on a digital machine too. (If you’re not sure which type of buttonholes your sewing machine makes, take a look at the manual.)

Four-step buttonholes take a bit more effort than the one-step kind, but the good thing about them is you have more control over how they turn out. Always always always test sew a buttonhole (or five) on a double scrap of your fabric (interfaced if your project) before starting on your precious garment, so you have a chance to alter the settings and check everything is in order first. The other key with four-step buttonholes is to ensure that you’re stitching them to the correct length.

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

Mark the buttonhole on your fabric. Attach the buttonhole foot to your sewing machine, and position the fabric underneath it so the window is showing the full buttonhole and the top end of the buttonhole (the end furthest away from you) is underneath the needle. Lace the thread under the foot and towards the back.

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

Set the stitch length to 0.5 to 1mm. We’re going to start by sewing the left side of the buttonhole – set your machine to buttonhole stitch 1 (check your manual if you’re not sure which one that is, or if your machine looks different to mine).

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

Put your foot down on the pedal to start sewing – your machine will make short, dense zigzag stitches to form the left-hand side of the buttonhole. Stop sewing when you reach the bottom of the buttonhole marking. You want to end with the needle on the left of the zigzag – turn the handwheel if it hasn’t already landed on the left.

Now set the machine to buttonhole stitch 2/4. Slowly sew five stitches to form the bottom of the buttonhole, stopping with the needle on the right.

To sew the right-hand side of the buttonhole, set the machine to buttonhole stitch 3. Sew until you reach the top of the buttonhole marking.

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

Set the machine to buttonhole stitch 2/4 again and sew about five stitches across the top of the buttonhole.

Finally, set the machine to the straight stitch and sew a couple of stitches and reverse stitches over the top of the buttonhole to secure the threads in place.

How to Sew Four-Step Buttonholes - Tilly and the Buttons

And that’s it!

Now you can open up your buttonhole with a seam ripper. It's a good idea to stick a pin in each end to act as a buffer so you don't accidentally rip through your fabric :)

PS. If you’d like to watch a video lesson on making buttonholes, check out my online workshop, Sew Your Own Shirt or Shirt Dress.

3 comments:

  1. Buttonholes & zips- enough to put me off any project!

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  2. I love my one step button hole foot. I haven't done button holes this way since sewing on my mum's old machine back when I was at school.

    BTW, I love my buttonhole chisel for cutting the fabric. It makes a much neater cut, and there's no risk of slipping and cutting through the end of your buttonhole.

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  3. I know this is a few weeks old now, but I wanted to thank you for this post. I have a lovely Janome machine but it is 15+ years old and the 4-step buttonhole had always put me off making anything with buttons. I had no idea that feet like these existed and I had only tried making buttonholes using a standard foot which means you can't see what you're doing and decided that I would have to save up for a swish new one-step. Anyway, I ordered one for my machine and it came today and it is brilliant and now I want a shirtdress!

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