22 March 2012

One Week, One Pattern: Fascinating Statistical Analysis

If you're not already excited about the start of OWOP! on Saturday, my fascinating quantitative and qualitative analysis of participants' tastes and habits will have you jumping up and down in no time! At the time of writing, 91 people have signed up to One Week, One Pattern, pledging to wear things they've made from one sewing pattern all week. Want to see some pie charts? You've come to the right place...



First let's look at the patterns being used by company. Colette Patterns is a clear favourite with OWOP-ers, which we could probably have guessed already knowing what a strong following they have developed with sewing bloggers. Joint second most popular for OWOP are Simplicity and self-drafted patterns. I was initially surprised by how many people (me included) have chosen patterns they've made themselves, but if you think about it, it makes sense that the most wearable patterns can be those that you have customised for your own individual style and body shape. Burda came in third, followed by Sewaholic, McCalls and Vogue in joint fourth place - good work by Sewaholic, a relatively new company, for rivalling the big guys! It's also great to see a fairly long tail of smaller designers including, a couple of which I hadn't heard of before.


Looking at the type of garment chosen, it's not surprising that tops came out on top, as they're easy to restyle. Skirts as another separate are also popular, but why is it that we sew so few pairs of trousers? Oh yes, I remember, because they're so ruddy difficult to fit! Well, that's why I don't sew trousers (or have given up twice) - what about you? I'm determined to finish a pair soon though. You can remind me I said that.

Asked why they chose their OWOP! pattern, the most common reasons given were that the patterns are quick to make; simple shapes that are easy to restyle and dress up or down; comfortable, flattering and provide a great fit; and versatile with different variations available. Have a look at the submissions in the comments on this post if you want to read more.

  

And the most used patterns by OWOP-ers? SorbettoRenfrew and Violet. Looking at the simple shapes it's easy to see why they are considered wearable and remixable. I'm often drawn to patterns with fancy details and unusual style lines, the kind of thing you can't buy in the shops. But it's also good to sew things that you'll wear on those days when you don't want to "dress up", or even the kind of thing you'd wear out running, for yoga or to sleep in.

Speaking of sleeping, are you still awake or have I out-geeked myself with this post?! If you're still reading, your reward is advance notice of some exciting (like, actually exciting - not pie charts) prizes to be won in three - yes, three! - giveaways next week. I really wish I could enter! In the meantime, please do try to out-geek me - do you have any "interesting" observations about the OWOP! data?

UPDATE: Due to popular demand (well, two people asking), I've put the data into a google docs spreadsheet so you can create your own statistical analyses. Wooooooooop!

[Soundtrack: 'Chartsengrafs' by Grandaddy]

35 comments:

  1. I don't have any interesting observations but, I do like your charts :-). I can't wait to see how everyone meets the challenge!

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  2. Oh dear lordy you've outdone yourself here lady. These are fab. I have nothing to add other than I'd love to know the ratio of vintage to modern patterns being used. Just wondering whether we veer towards modern styles for mix-and-match ease and vintage for 'special' outfits, Although I imagine that might be difficult to extract!

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    1. Why thank you! Very few people went with vintage patterns, so your hypothesis is correct.

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  3. This is great, Tilly! I love surveys & statistics, but never think about about applying them to sewing. Glad to see Collette & Sewaholic are up near the top, but what a great variety. I'm now motivated to go out & find out more about Salme, Schnittreif, Heather Ross and Dixie DIY, to name just a few I've never heard of.

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  4. if you send me the raw data i'll plug it into the stats package and see if we have significance! (p is less than 0.05) need raw data as you can't do stats on percentages. (yes i am really really sad!)

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    1. Why certainly! In fact, I'll go one better and put the spreadsheet in google docs in case anyone else would like to number crunch too. Here you go - http://bit.ly/GH8CoY. Let me know what you come up with!

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  5. Nice number crunching! It's great to see the range of patterns but like you I'm impressed with the people making multiples of trousers - nice work ladies!
    I'd love to join in with this challenge but don't have a viable pattern to use at the minute and don't have the time for frantic sewing. Hoping to resolve that soon though - I hope you do it again!

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  6. Fab pie charts, not geeky at all. I'm a new sewer so really looking forward to seeing the OWOPs from pattern companies I've never heard of, I think it will be really inspiring. How about future pie charts on new patterns people were inspired to try following OWOP?
    I'm very excited to be taking part, my son is away at uni and rang last night asking is I'm 'ready for OWOP' - a strong indication that I might have mentioned it once or twice!

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    1. Hahaha that's great! I love it when IRL people start saying things like "OWOP", "Beignet skirt" and "Casey's blog".

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  7. I will admit, when I saw the title of this post, I thought "boring". It wasn't. Very interesting how many people used independent pattern companies. Kudos to Colette and fellow Canadian Sewaholic for capturing so many of the sewists in this challenge!

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    1. I don't blame you, I almost fell asleep writing it :)

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  8. Eeeee! Stats! And sewing! I love it. Thanks for taking the time to put it together! I'm so excited to start... although I really should put some work into making more than two versions of the Peony dress I'll be wearing, because they are pretty distinctive and could get pretty repetitive after 7 days!

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  9. Great stats. I think I actually fall somewhere between self-drafted and Colette, as my self drafted stuff is originally based on Colette patterns!

    The charts are awesome, what do you use to make them? I've decided to keep track of sewing expenses/projects this year and I'd love to have something to visualize with.

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    1. I just used the charts tab in Excel. If you have an iPhone you can get some great apps for keeping track of budgets and spending.

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  10. Fab post Tilly! I was already looking forward to taking part in OWOP, now I'm just plain excited!!! I love all the stats and it's so interesting to see what people are planning on wearing. Sadly, I'm not a trend setter, I'm a sheep - seems like lots of people will be donning the Renfrew! I'm guessing you'll be wearing your self-drafted blouses that I adore so much, can't wait to see them!

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  11. These are great! I love seeing stats about group projects.
    I realize after seeing the Google Doc that I forgot to give my blog where I'll be posting a pics round-up (http://thecataloguer.wordpress.com) Can't wait!

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  12. Oh, yay for math and chart geekery! ;) I love that so many people are using either self-drafted or independent patterns! I'm really looking forward to your roundup and everybody's experiences!

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  13. This is great. Pie charts are so pretty. I hope you don't hate me for ruining all your nice statistics but I actually changed my mind about which pattern I'm using because the weather has suddenly got colder. I'm going to use vintage Butterick 9405, a blouse pattern.

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  14. I'm a massive fan of the pie chart! It's really interesting to see how it all breaks down. I'm very much looking forward to the start of OWOP!

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  15. Nice stats!!!!!!!!! V. exciting. I'm surprised that the Big Four weren't more prominant in the charts, it's nice to see.

    xxx

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  16. Re trousers: I have here a copy of "Sew U" by Wendy Mullin and in the "pants" section she writes: "As for commercial pant patterns that have been available until now... well, let's just say things haven't changed much since Grandma's swinging-single days".... I'm really looking forward to seeing everyone's tried and tested favourites next week and if I come across a pair of trousers that might even look good on me, well then I'll have found the holy grail.

    What a great idea OWOP is! Can't wait.

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    1. Haha! I do like some trouser (I can't bring myself to say "pants") patterns, eg. Colette Clovers (although whether I could pull them off is another matter) and those lovely sailor-style ones that Handmade Jane and others have made. It's fitting them round my lady lumps that I struggle with!

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  17. I don't think the statistics are geeky at all. As much as I like to say sewing is creative, it involves a lot of math! I learned that real fast with quilting. I am looking forward to seeing all the OWOP creations. Cool way to (literally) unite the sewers of the world.

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    1. Definitely, pattern cutting requires maths too. Luckily it was one of my favourite subjects at school!

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  18. this is a big bundle of AWESOMENESS. i think sewing peeps love charts and graphs because of all the attention to detail...

    can i tell you how happy i am that i'm a one percenter? i don't know why that thrills me. it's not like i think being a 5 percenter is bad. 5 percenters are awesome.

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  19. I love a good pie chart Tilly! Great post!

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  20. I'm not much of a commenter, but THANK YOU for sharing your love of statistical analyses right there alongside sewing. Don't ever think your charts go unappreciated :)

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  21. I am happy to see a chart, it really helps me think about sewing my core wardbrobe, b/c I am determined to create TNT's this year!( thanks for doing these charts!)
    If we all had basic TNT's that we reached for when we needed something done that fits well, we could concentrate on the textiles we sew with a whole lot more ~ I have long wanted to sew Sorbetto in silk dupioni but have not gotten to it yet, or how about charmeasue??,
    That said. my 2012 goal is ALL TNT's, 2 T's( w/ diff necklines to self draft and a tank,),, 2 blouse patterns, 2 skirt patterns 2 pants patterns ( casual and dress trouser) and one really great jacket pattern,~I think that is enough to shoot for in one year which means I will be remaking the same patterns over and over again ( clearly they must represent my style tho)~,
    What I think is a shame is that pants are So low on the sewing list, and we all wear them so much!
    Is there a way we can seek out a great pattern and spend time w/ the fitting of them?? I think we would find it is time well spent and a challenge , being the challenge oriented person I am, I love this stuff
    May I suggest some great fitting DVD's??( Sandra Betzina has one that I really love and UNDERSTOOD!) Pants for Real People, the book was a great help also~ These 2 have helped me BIG time w/ achieving good fit` I never knew how to take extra fabric out of my lower back seat or that I had a tilted waist!( who knew??)
    Do not neglect the humble yoga pant as a start, easy to fit and very fun if you can whip 4 up in a week ( which I did), it is a great first step towards pants 101! Good sewing to all,,, and may you all find patterns that really WORK for you that are utterly dependable each time you reach for them w/ a new and fresh outlook!

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  22. PS I thought I hated math b/c my degrees are in science and music, until I started to knit and then I realized to self design it is ALL about math,,but then again music is math and math is music so I guess it was there all along anyway,( just in a different form!)

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  23. Tilly, not only do you keep us informed, but reading your posts always leave me tickled. Speaking of OWOP I would be ready with my debut in April, towards the end part, hope I'm not the only late one.Love the pie charts and the statistics. That latter word used to fill me with dread, during my school days though.

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  24. I'm a sucker for stat thanks for that

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  25. I love this! Sewing and stats = love!
    I would love to participate in the challenge, wish I'd known earlier so I could have prepared.

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  26. i did a blog post - you can bore yourself ridged here! http://undomesticatedscientist.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/lies-dam-lies-and-statistics.html

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  27. I love this, but im afraid the only contribution I can make is the fact that there is a wide range of people doing OWOPS! ;)

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