24 February 2013

Your Mathilde Blouses: Part 1

Can you hear me squeal with delight every time I see a photo of a Mathilde Blouse made by you? I'm just blown away by how lovely they're looking! Here are a few recent makes by you...


Kirsty made her stunning blouse in a floral Liberty tana lawn - check it out in its fully glory on her blog. Kirsty says:
"I bought the Mathilde Blouse the moment I saw the pattern. It is such a cute and stylish blouse with gorgeous detailing. I knew it had to be part of my wardrobe. I was a little intimidated by the 7 buttons and the tucks at first, but Tilly’s online tutorials were so comprehensive, that it made sewing it an enjoyable experience. The fact that each of the steps is separate helps break up the sewing into manageable pieces, for those like me who need to spread the sewing out over a period of time. Oh and I loved being able to tick off the steps on the checklist! My Mathilde is a real 'romantic stroll in the garden' blouse."


Marie's version is seriously elegant. Tucked into a skirt this would look very Mr Selfridge-chic, non? Marie was kind enough to test out the pattern before it was released, and wrote about her experience here. She reports:
"Mathilde is so dreamy - with irresistible details like back buttons, frothy sleeves and tasty tucks. For my version I wanted to do right by the pattern by creating a chic and romantic look, so I knew immediately that it was destined to be paired with some delicate 1960s voile from my stash. And I'm delighted with the result! I would encourage anyone wanting to try Mathilde to go for it - Tilly's detailed instructions and complimentary blog posts expertly cater to varied abilities."


We jump from the Edwardian era to the present day with Karen's very modern, super cool blouse. Karen made a feature out of the yoke, making it in a sequined edge fabric - take a closer look. She tells us:
"For me, the Mathilde pattern represents a perfect combination of creative freedom and technical discipline. Creative freedom: customising the yoke and having fun choosing button and fabric combinations. Technical discipline: getting those tucks just right and making sure the button bands match up! Oh, and there's a tick list - instant gratification for my inner list-maker."


Jo's blouse started out as a muslin (test version), but she loved it so much she's now wearing it for real. Take a peek at her hilarious photos! Jo says:
"There are so many things that I love about this blouse. The instructions... The tick boxes are genius... As for the pattern itself - I love that it is simple enough for a beginner to put together but has those little touches, in particular the tucks and the buttons, that stop it looking like it has been made by a beginner, even if you are one. The sleeves are fabulous. Finally I love that this pattern is so versatile. It is modest enough for work, looks great with jeans and is dressy enough for evening wear depending on what fabric and embellishments are used. The buttons can blend in or be a feature, and it can be tucked in or lengthened to tunic or dress length for a totally different look. You could even leave off the sleeves for a summer top. I am just about to cut out another, and as soon as I can justify buying new fabric I'm going to make a bright pink version. And after seeing Solvi's I think I need a black one as well."


Orange buttons is starting to become a trend! My beautiful friend Mai lives hundreds of miles away from me in Scotland, but the Mathilde Blouse can bring us together (sob!):
"I love the Mathilde Blouse! It's such a beautiful design and unusually versatile too: it can look casual, cute, romantic or super dramatic, depending on what fabric, colour and pattern choices you make. The instructions are really clear and engagingly chatty, and the construction is simple, but it encouraged me to strive for something like perfection (those tucks!). I chose quite a flamboyant iteration for my first version, with a big bold graphic print and contrast buttons. I'm planning a red wool pencil skirt to show it to its best advantage. Note that I refer to it as my first version; there will be more..."

Check out more gorgeous blouses in the Maker Gallery. If you're feeling inspired to make your own, you can buy the pattern for just £7. Use the insanely detailed step-by-step photo instructions to guide you through every stage, or take a workshop with me at Ray Stitch sewing school.

Have you made a Mathilde Blouse? I'd LOVE to see! Submit your bestest photos to the Maker Gallery by leaving a link to your blog / Pinterest / Twitter / Facebook, or send me an email.

14 comments:

  1. They are great! really wanna start mine,just searching for time:)

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  2. Oh wow, I love them all! Kirsty's in the Liberty tana lawn is beautiful and Mai's buttons are fab!

    This has given me the much needed kick up the bum to buy this and get going - I have the sewing fear of the buttonholes and tucks, but hoping your brilliant step-by-step instructions will rescue me!

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  3. These are all so pretty! The wheels are turning.. I just might have to join the mathilde club once I get back home from school.

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  4. I'm so going to make this sometime in the future...
    Seeing all the different versions everyone has made s really inspiring!

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  5. I absolutely love your friends Mai's version. Pity she doesn't have a blog, I would be following for sure. Like her style.

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  6. Marie's and Mai's versions are just too darn pretty! I may have to give this one a try once I get through some more of my sewing "to do" list!

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  7. These look great! I love seeing all the different versions! It makes the pattern seem so versatile by seeing it made up by such different people and their different styles. So fun :)

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  8. Love seeing how different people interpret the same pattern, so many goegeous versions!

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  9. I have a rather dumb question. Can this blouse be put on without buttoning the buttons? I live alone and there is no way I could wear this if I had to have help from someone to button up the back. But then it looks loose enough that maybe I could get it on without touching the buttons. Thank you!

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    1. I leave the top button undone and just pull the whole thing over my head - I can then easily reach back and do the top button up. Hope this helps ;o)

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    2. Haha you're not the first person who's asked that question, don't worry! The design is loose-fitting so I can get mine on with the middle buttons done up, so it's just the top and button ones to do up.

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  10. I agree with everyone - the Maker Gallery really shows how versatile this blouse is! I just bought the pattern the other day after seeing Kirsty's version on her blog.

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  11. I love it, but am too scared of button holes. In all my years of sewing I have gone great lengths to avoid button holes!

    http://iliska-dreams.blogspot.com.au/

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