6 September 2013

Sewing For Your Style: Hints and Tips


Learning to make your own clothes opens up such a wonderful world of sartorial possibilities. No longer reliant on whatever happens to be on trend right now and available in the shops, home dressmakers can dream up an outfit - any outfit - and get to work creating it.

Yet sometimes the sheer number of different combinations of colours, fabrics, patterns and embellishments can become overwhelming. When I first started sewing, I got a bit overexcited at the possibilities that were suddenly available to me. Many of the things I made back then sadly no longer get worn - they just don't feel totally me. These days I have a much stronger sense of my own style and make more of an effort to make things that will fit that style. As a result, I am dressing handmade nearly every day and feeling very much myself in my wardrobe.

I once remarked to a friend of mine that she always looked stylish and so very "Rachael". She divulged that she considers the way she dresses (black and gold, modern, grown up, sexy - my words, not hers) to be part of her personal brand, alongside her website and everything else. Initially I was taken aback as I'd never thought of clothes in this way, but the more I thought about it, the more it made absolute sense. Why not make the way you dress distinctive? Carrying her branding through to what clothes she turns up to events in has contributed to Rachael's brand recognition, which particularly important in her work as a freelance consultant, but also just... well, I just think it's really cool!

While I'm not suggesting we should all match our blouses to our marketing brochures, I do think that having a signature style can make you feel more comfortable, confident and authentic. Some of you asked me to share some tips on developing a signature style, so here goes, and do share your own tips below...


1) Define your look
Being able to articulate your personal style is a strong step towards building a handmade wardrobe that you're excited to wear. Maybe you don't yet dress like this all the time, in which case, what is the ideal look that you would like to achieve? For example, I would describe the style I'm aiming for as classic, preppy, Nouvelle Vague chic, a hint of sixties mod and a large serving of seventies denim, shaken up into a cocktail of modern wearability. If you're not sure about your own signature style, have a think about who your style icons are and what kinds of looks make you swoon. Set up a Pinterest board or IRL scrapbook to document these looks, and over time you should be able to see a theme emerging. When choosing your next sewing project, ask yourself whether it matches your signature style. After all, there's no point spending all that time making something if wearing it doesn't make you really happy.


2) Develop a colour palette
Walking into a fabric shop, all the colours of the rainbow are before your eyes, and it's easy to get overwhelmed. Books such as this one will guide you through choosing shades and tones that complement your skin, eye and hair colour, and thus make you look amazing. But choosing a colour palette isn't only about looking good - it's also about feeling like yourself. What colours do you love? Furthermore, what colours will work well together? My own colour palette is red, blue, yellow, navy, teal, black and white. I'm not saying they're the only colours I'm going to sew from now on (watch out for a pink coat that I'm dreaming of making in the next few months), but focusing on these colours makes it much easier both to pick out fabric and to get dressed in the morning.


3) Choose prints wisely
I lurrrrve browsing fabric shops - both online and IRL. The prints! The prints! It's so easy to set out wanting to achieve a sophisticated-sexy look but get overexcited and end up making a dress with badgers on it. If woodland creature chic is the look you are going for, then that's great (and why not? Elks are in right now). But if not, have a think about what prints will work for your style. Geometric? Floral? Quirky? Abstract? And don't forget solid colours - so often neglected by home dressmakers, yet they are so wearable and will show off the style lines of a garment so well. If you're still excited about the badgers, you can show your love in other ways without turning it into a dress. For example, you could make a cushion out of it, or again, give props on Pinterest.


4) Sew for your lifestyle

I love dresses, don't you? Especially dresses in bright red with big skirts and fancy details. Yet I hardly ever wear things like that - unfortunately my life isn't one big cocktail party. One of the most important lessons I've learnt about dressing handmade is to sew clothes that I will actually wear on a daily basis. Do you spend most of your waking life sitting at a desk, holding small children, presenting at power meetings, digging flower patches, standing behind a till, schmoozing clients...? What kinds of garments will make you feel comfortable in that situation? As Tasia so eloquently puts it, sew more cake and less frosting.


5) Be yourself
Cliché alert! But a cliché worth mentioning with images of clothing abounding on the interwebs and competing for our attention. It's easy to find yourself influenced by what other people are making or to get caught up in the frenzy any time a new sewing pattern is released. But catch your breath and ask yourself whether the project you are considering making matches your signature style. If it doesn't, and you still really want to make it, well that's great! We all need some diversity in our lives... go wild! But if you're keen to build up a wardrobe full of handmade garments that will make you swoon on a daily basis, then make sure that whatever you spend all that time sewing makes you happy and feels you.

The image above is a mood board put together by Breanna, the lovely and talented designer of my new logo, bringing together some of the images I chose to reflect my style and the look I wanted for my brand. Every time I look at this mood board, I feel a bit gooey inside and want to do a little dance - I just love it so much! It perfectly reflects the signature style I'm aiming for. Why not try making a signature style mood board of your own?

Over to you... How would you describe your signature style? Whether dream or reality! And who are your style icons? I'd love to hear...

PS. Don't forget to join us for the #SewingSocial Twitter chat on Sunday!

PPS. In other exciting news, my genius brother Joe has just launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund his latest invention - a slim, wireless flash that takes great photos for the iPhone without the harshness of regular flash lighting. It's such a great idea! You're in safe hands here - one of my earliest memories of Joe is him aged about seven taking apart any household appliance he could get his hands on and rewiring it to work better, go faster etc. As a grown up, he went on to help set up Google's London office and develop web and mobile products, before emigrating to Chicago to write code I'll never hope to understand, and spending his weekends tinkering away at his amazing inventions in the basement. And this one is gonna be big. So go on, pledge all your money and tell everyone you've ever met :)

58 comments:

  1. I love this post. On my drive to work this morning (it's 8 am as I write this), I was just thinking of what garments in my closet are no longer "me". I was thinking of how I like to present myself at work and these words usually come to mind - strong, confident, professional, urban. I'm from NY so I love the strong urban look you see there. I think that's what I'm building up my wardrobe to look like.

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  2. I completely agree. I love seeing up flouncy dresses, & as I'll be making my bridesmaids dresses over the next few months it's very tempting to just make loads of pretty frocks...but I work for an investment bank. My everyday wardrobe would be much better off with subdued pencil skirts, blazers, shift dresses etc. I'm very seasonal with the colours I wear, but always come back to deep tones of purple, blue & brown, with the odd flash of a cream blouse.
    Your style looks to suit you so well...it goes to show us that it's well worth sticking with what works.

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  3. This post has arrived at a great time for me. I'm finally getting out of clothing rut. I tend to be all solid colors, but recently bought 3 shirts with prints and I love them. I noticed that all three shirts are in the pink/red/purple family. It's been a long time since I've really been excited about new clothing purchases. My work style tends to be pencil skirt or pants with a top. Adding these fun prints to a black skirt will be great. It's also helpful for me to remember -It's just clothes!- It's not permanent. I would like to make some pencil skirts with fun prints to pair with solid tops.

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  4. Very good tips! I went through exactly that: sewing in all the colours and prints because they looked so pretty... on someone else. On top of that I had no idea what my style was, I would even say I didn't have one. Three years later and I know exactly what I'll wear and what colours not to wear. No orange, yellow, or red, but blues and greens. No florals and dots but geometric prints. A little fitted with clean lines, some edgyness, no frills, bows or ruffles. And comfortable above all!

    Thanks for sharing this, Tilly!

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  5. Great post! Part of my sewing adventureis to help me discover what my personal style is.

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  6. I am starting to plan my autumn winter wardrobe and will be taking these useful tips on board. Thanks Tilly!

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  7. Love love love this post. This is something I am actively trying to do at the moment. I have a bad history of sewing things because I want to learn a new technique rather than because I would actually wear it. Although it seems like a good idea at the time, I always come to regret it later when I'm stood in front of my wardrobe with nothing to wear.

    I am also harbouring secret plans to sew on a slightly more full time basis, so I definitely need to define my style more exactly in this way...!

    x

    p.s. New blog layout is BEAUTIFUL!

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  8. Good post! I had some photos taken for my professional stuff and only realised when I was popping them on my blog etc. that all my online branding, my book covers and my business cards, etc. match my favourite colours to wear - teal and brown, in my case. I still can't tell if my author page on Amazon looks cool or weird because I'm wearing the same colours as my books, though ... can you take these things too far?

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  9. I think your last point is so important for sewers - it's very easy to get caught up in the latest sewing trend that's sweeping the blog world. Right now Grainline Archers are EVERYWHERE. They look wonderful and I love the idea of learning the new skills, but I have never enjoyed wearing a button down shirt in my life, even one that fit properly. So every time I go to bookmark the pattern, I have to remind myself of that fact!

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  10. So true! When I just started sewing I would often make garments because I had seen them around, or because I thought they were pretty, but without really thinking about how to fit them into my wardrobe. I'm currently cleaning out my closet for a move and ended up ditching a whole lot of those early projects. Over the past year I've developed a pretty clear image of what I want to look like, and I find it easier and easier to stick to it!

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  11. You posted this at the perfect time as I am planning my Fall sewing and looking through my closet to decide what to keep , what fits well, and what do I like. I have some UFO's to finish and will go from there and play on pintrest.
    Thank you.

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  12. Timely post! I'm struggling with that, myself. I see all these amazing things that others are sewing & I have to stop & think about whether or not I'd actually ever wear some of those things. Answer: Not! I find that since my sewing time is so limited, I'm better off making things that I know I'll wear on a day in - day out basis.

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  13. Thank you Tilly for a great post! And you are like reading my mind! Thank you again.x

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  14. Tilly, I had planned to write about something similar today on my blog and I'm including a link to your page on it.

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  15. This is such a great post, and your new blog design is awesome!:-)

    I agree with you about the signature look - I think it´s a really powerful, yet subtle way of showing the world who you are. I feel that with age and time, my personal style is changing, and things I made a couple of years ago, just doesn´t fit my lifestyle, or the way I want to present myself any longer.

    I also have become increasingly interested in developing separate work and leisure wear, but at the same time let both wardrobes be representative of "me". I love the process of this, and think that your ideas about Pinterest inspiration boards are great!

    Have a nice weekend! :-)

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  16. That is a good posting and it speaks my heart out. I could always make one cute 50s dress. But as you said it, my life isn't a cocktail party either ;) It makes me sad to see them in my wardrobe.

    For this fall I have some basic pieces in mind. I'll try to buy not so many printed fabrics, but something with a nice feel and drape.
    I need also more separates, good basic separates to combine.

    I hope this plan will turn out good ;)

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    1. It doesn't make me sad to see them in my wardrobe, it's making me sad to see them but so scarcely wear them ;)

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  17. Oh, Tilly, I love this post! I'm often told I dress very "Stephanie" but I really don't know what that means. I admit I have waaay more dresses than I know what to do with, but I love fashion and so I just go with it. Anyway, my point is, I think the idea of branding your fashion style is brilliant! I wouldn't want to find myself limited to only certain colors and styles, but I think without realizing it, I've already branded myself (hence the many comments I receive. I do realize one of my biggest problems is when I make clothes for myself. I still seem to get it wrong and never make something I actually wear. Your thoughts have inspired me! And if nothing else, I need to embrace solids more :)

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  18. Oh so true! This post is one that truly speaks to my authentic self. I started on this journey last year when I realized that I make too many things that just don't get worn. Now I absolutely ask myself all these questions before I jump into making a garment. Will it get worn? Where do I have to wear it to? What shoes can I wear it with (being able to wear flats is sooooooo important to me)? Our personal style is dictated more on an everyday level that by the clothes wear would wear to a cocktail party anyway. Totally didn't realize that for the longest time. Awesome post Tilly!!!

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  19. What a wonderful post Tilly! It's something that I've been meaning to look into for a while now. As women, our body shape changes so often due to pregnancies (men are so lucky). We then hit middle age and it just goes haywire.

    Speaking as somebody that's just joined the "Fifties Club" I feel that choosing a more age appropriate style is more important now. I really can't get away with dressing like I was in my 20s or early 30s anymore. Your hints and tips here have really got my thinking cap on. Now to go and discover my own "Ruby" style :)

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  20. I'm always buying things that I think are fantastic but don't really have an oppurtunity to wear! And my personal style is all over the place but if I had to I'd probably describe it as a mixture of hippy, grungr and boho. My main inspiration comes form the 70s and the 90s. This is such good advice for choosing patterns and fabrics though, and I adore your imspiration boards! xx

    www.jessthetics.wordpress.com

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  21. Ooooh, lovely images and mood boards! I too often fall into the trap of going straight for the bright, crazy prints (lots of birds, flowers, animal prints...but no badgers yet)! I love colour and prints equally, but what I could do with more of are solid colours that I can mix and match. So I have to be strong and see the potential of solids, rather than get sidetracked by the prints all the time!

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  22. What a useful post! I read it just hours after gifting a gorgeous, floaty smock-styled top away because it didn't work on me. I'd never have bought it rtw, so heaven knows why I thought it would be different if I made it. To my credit, though, I have so far managed to walk away from the Laurel pattern as I know it just wouldn't suit me.

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  23. Thank you for posting this! I've definitely fallen into the trap of just sewing party dresses in the past. I used to think basics were for buying and 'special' clothes were for sewing - blogs like yours have really started changing my thinking. Currently, I'm endeavoring to improve my technical skills and start building a me-made wardrobe I can wear daily. My other challenge is that I'm just at the beginning of my career and am struggling to find clothes that represent my personal style but that are also more professional. I think the advice you've offered here will really help me with that! Cheers!

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  24. This is a hugely interesting blog post - thank you, Tilly. I have a knee jerk aversion to anyone calling themselves a 'brand', but I am also deeply aware that this is an irrational emotional response. All the time, I see people cleverly dressing with conscious branding - the publisher who always wears bow ties, the author who's known for her collection of silver rings. Branding applies when you're using your clothes to give yourself identity in the professional market place - as you're doing with your blogging becoming a job and your friend does as a freelancer. I DO think that's distinct to choosing your personal style, but then am I nit picking over vocab? I mean, what's really the difference between 'brand' and 'personal style'? On another point, I believe that mistakes are a deeply important part of exploring the creative process. So on one level, I want to encourage the badger dresses! But for anyone moving past those first early explorations of sewing, this is a really great blog post. I suspect I subconsciously choose 'branding' in that I know strong, solid colours suit me. But I ain't ever gonna stop myself from the odd spontaneous and crazy fabric choice! Lots of food for thought - thanks, Tilly!

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  25. Hi Tilly a really interesting post. I am a little shy to say that many people where I work always say I look as if I am going to a wedding - I am hoping that this means I look smart every day. Like you I love anything red, dresses, brooches and high heels. I never leave the house without a brooch and earrings, usually have red somewhere on me plus my favourite perfume. I can take on the world when I am dressed like this - yes this is my brand which has taken years to develop. I have reached a point in my life where I don't have to chase fashion anymore, I am confident that I can mix and match and feel good about what I have on. I hope all this makes sense Tilly. You have wonderful style and remind me of myself many many years ago. I love your blog Tilly you always have something interesting to talk about, many thanks
    Lots of love as always
    Dorothy
    :-)xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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  26. Great post, Tilly! I would define my style as gamine with a dose of Pippi Longstocking, as I love, love colour and fun prints.

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  27. This is SUCH A GREAT POST. Thanks so much for all these wonderful nuggets of gold. Everything you write is just so true and I've been thinking about this for a while now. My conclusion is that I basically need to be less of a magpie, and, as you say, stick with my vision of how I want to dress and look. Thanks!

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  28. Best post ever! The only thing I'd add (and I add it because I always forget it, too) is texture. Think about color, prints, cut, and texture as you develop your style. Texture adds interest, and a little can go a long way. A bumpy little jacket, an satin trim, a lightweight top with a heavyweight linen skirt are all good varieties of texture.

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  29. Thanks Tilly for this thought provoking blog. I've only just started sewing with the intention of making my daily wardrobe instead of shop bought. I am so excited with what I can create that I feel I want to sew every pattern I see (well nearly everyone) and choosing fabric is like being a child in a sweet shop - where do I start?!! I am so in awe of the clothes other sewists create, I'm left thinking 'why didn't I think of that fabric', or embellishments etc, etc. Creating a mood board will enable me to visualise all the styles and colours that appeal to me and then revisit when I need inspiration, or guidance. So much time and effort (and money) is spent creating an outfit, it's important to get it right.

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  30. Sound advice ! Playing on Pinterest has certainly help me establish I've a thing for pleats, pintucks & Peter Pan collars !

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  31. It took me a while to find my personal style Despite being blonde, i prefer darker colours like forest green, navy, brown, black and mustard. Not sure if they suit me but i like them. I also have definitely settled on anything 60s or even 70s style. I feel comfortable in the things i make and buy in that style. Stripes and spots are welcome also. I do wear bright colours alot, but i pair them with a darker colour - unless its summer then ill wear anything!

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  32. Thanks - this is possibly the best post I've read about sewing and developing your personal style.

    Makes me wonder what we all did before pinterest! For me it's one of the best places around to find inspiration.

    http://somewhereyonder.blogspot.com/

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  33. Wow how exciting for your brother. Good luck to him!

    I like this piece in that people who I think of as having good style are people who have a pretty clear vision of what works for them (I think you have a clear personal style!). Many people I see around me, on the other hand, seem to instead more or less copy the styles around them (I've fallen victim to this myself in the past). As Karen said above, being experimental can be really good, but ultimately personal style tends to find its groove. It's also a great way to save money (spend on high-quality materials or pieces to wear over and over again, instead of disposable fashion or sewing that sits in the closet).

    I had a really clear style when I was a teenager and in my early 20s (a mix of vintage tomboy chic and ladylike vintage), then went through an experimental stage as I was trying to fit in (lots of denim), then went through another experimental stage in my late 30s (this was my 1970s phase, with a bit more sexiness than I feel comfortable with, e.g. DVF wrap dresses, flares that I never wear anymore). Now, in my 40s, I'm definitely back to a style that more closely mimics the one I had as a teenager. I love knee-length pencil skirts in both neutrals and interesting solids (red, burgundy, pine green), worn with menswear-inspired striped shirts and vintage heels (really love 1970s Ferragamo shoes!), classic trousers and more shirts (lot of pale blue), cigarette pants and plain colour full skirts, classic suits in pale gray and navy (no black permitted), hand knitted sweaters (both casual and dressy). I would call the look refined tomboy chic with the occasional mod dress thrown in for special occasions! I know I won't feel comfortable in mini-skirts, front-buttoned dresses, low-cut or sexy items, tight skirts or pants, novelty fabrics...so although I love seeing other people's sewing, I don't make these things. All that said, I do think that it's good to be open to style "evolution," particularly as one ages.

    Great piece, as always! I think I'm going to make a mood board!

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  34. Great post! Very inspiring. I immediately had to go and create a pinterest board for my style.

    Sewing too much "frosting" is exactly my problem. I always want to make fancy dresses that don't work in my everyday life in reality.

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  35. This is soo true. I've been sewing for a bit more than a year and I did a lot of frosting especially at the beginning. I'm still in the process of discovering what I want to wear and it's still a bit of trial and error. Some things I made I wear them all the time. That tells me when I should make more or just stop from making something.

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  36. Quality posts like this one articulates why I think sewing one's own clothes is key to to expressing the nuances of one's personal style. Please keep them coming! :)

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  37. A lovely post, and thought-provoking for me as a beginning sewist with a defined personal style (let's call it preppy Anthropolgie, or should it be Anthro preppy?). It's definitely something I think of always when shopping, but not as much when sewing (yet!). Off to troll my Pinterest boards for some sewing inspiration.

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  38. This covers a lot of what I've been thinking about lately. I've been buying a lot of color and style books and going through my pinterest account to find out what I REALLY want to dress like and what I would really wear and what would look best on me and then making a "want to sew" list with colors, patterns and inspiration. Great article summing up all these ideas!

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  39. I think you should add a bit about sewing for your body type! It is very important for personal style to know what shapes and materials flatter your figure. Be it short, petite, tall, plus, not every cute vintage look or current trend looks great on everyone. This is a lesson I had to learn in the beginning as a plus sized girl but I am sure it applies to everyone who doesn't look like a hyper idealized fashion sketch on the pattern package (who does!? lol!)

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  40. Thank you for this! I am always drawn to great prints and bold colours and also know I never actually wear them. I try using them in my home instead :) I'm still new to sewing clothing and finding the right fabrics I'd feel comfortable wearing. Learning to sew for my body type is another challenge: I love the androgyn simple sleek look, but it simply doesn't fit me. So much to learn!

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  41. This post is great Tilly! I love how confident you are in your own style, and love the idea of creating your own image as part of your brand! As a 15 year old I'm still very much discovering what my 'style' is, and experimenting with making clothes in very different. I hope to find sometime soon the best style for me, to look as lovely on and be as flattering as all your creations!
    lily x
    http://www.jolihouse.com/

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  42. My husband always makes fun of me because he thinks everything I make looks the same...I know what I like! Yes, it is usually stripey or blue/red/white, but thats me and I'm happy with it! Thanks for this great post tilly, I'll be making hubby dearest have a look next time he scoffs at my newest make!

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  43. Great post- really got me thinking about planning the next phase of projects with a little more care...

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  44. Hi Tilly - thanks for this post. I'm going to make a moodboard to help with my future projects and also for personal stuff - I'm a bit scattered at the moment and I'm sure this could help! Thanks x

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  45. It was really interesting to read what others had to say about their own style ;) If it was for me, I would wear jeans/t-shirt on daily basis, but you become sick of it after years, right? At this stage, I know what I like and what suits me and I am in the midst of shaping my personal style. Being very boyish, I'd definitely like to look more feminine and elegant. A style I aspire to is folk/ethnic mix with modern twist, something between Bjork and Frida Kahlo. But at the moment, I let myself experiment with whatever excites me.

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  46. hmmm... Nerd Punk Romanti-Candy-Goth, with hints of burlesque and lolita? Maybe less burlesque, and more the circus... With some exceptions made to be able to work efficiently all day!

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  47. Loved this post. It's really very practical and full of useful tips for me. I'm learning the ropes of sewing for my style, which if I think about it, seems a bit strange. I have no problems dressing or buying clothes for my style, but when it comes to sewing, somehow I was all over the place. I have begun to to connect sewing with my style and now I need to learn more about choice of fabrics to sew my style.

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  48. Love this post Tilly - and hilariously enough you and I seem to have similar taste! I bought that same yellow, navy and white fabric (the one you have as a scarf hanging over the stripy dress) to make a dress for Ascot. Such a great bold pattern.

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  49. Great post Tilly! I am lucky enough that working from home, I get to make and wear "frosting" a lot more than cake, that's just who I am.
    The new logo is beautiful!

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  50. What a fantastic post!! This one is super helpful, Tilly, thank you!

    I had a late flight back home yesterday and came into the office this morning wearing skinny jeans, which I never really do, because I'm running on little sleep and couldn't be bothered. I feel so out of sorts! A few people have even commented it's the first time they've seen me looking so "modern" and they thought it was odd. I can definitely see #5!

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  51. A really useful post, thank you. Something that has deterred me from making my own clothes (apart from a lack of confidence in my own ability) has been not finding patterns or prints that are 'me'.

    I think I will use pinterest more (like I need an excuse!) to try to shape my style and see how we go from there.

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  52. This is such a good post, and has sort of got me thinking. A lot of things are just not me, anymore. It's natural that everyone changes and evolves and sometimes those changes have an effect on the way we dress and choose to present ourselves.

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  53. This post has really encouraged me Tilly! I'm trying to get back into sewing after a very long hiatus and am desperately in love with the colour combinations of 70's glam rock (basically anything David and Angie Bowie wore between 1972 - 1974!)and the silhouettes of vintage Biba. I think a Pinterest board will be just the place to get myself started!

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  54. Terrific post! I'm in the process of preparing to sew a brand new wardrobe to suit my desires as well as my lifestyle. The lifestyle angle is the tough part for me. Trying to fit my taste in clothes and how I go through my day is a puzzle for me right now. Stay at home wife and homeschooling mother with various social activities on the side. I feel lovely and comfortable in very feminine clothing - dresses, skirts and soft blouses. I lean towards clothing that doesn't seem an obvious fit for my life and I'm struggling with how to marry the two. My color pallet is easy, it hasn't changed much in years. Yes! I want to swoon on a daily basis!

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  55. This is an absolutely fantastic post and it made me reflect a lot on my own sewing practices. I hate to say this but I have been completely suckered into sewing a lot of clothes that aren't my style at all, in fabrics that are adorable but I just wouldn't wear normally! Dresses are my absolutely weakness... I only wear solid dresses and yet I sew them all in prints. This post has been eye-opening and a little depressing for me :(!

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  56. You have so many good tips here. I definitely sew too many dresses and too many prints. I'm trying reform myself though. :) I love your new logo by the way.

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  57. I am sorry this comment is late, I dig into your Blog when I can and learn something every time, thank you. I love the idea of a Pinterest Board as I'm constantly losing bookmarks when I kill another one of my base units *sigh* SO MANY great ideas, and I noticed I can 'Pin' this post too - fantastic!

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