Friday, 20 December 2013

Free pattern! Make a (fake) Fur Collar


Surprise! A little gift for you to say thank you for reading and for helping to make this a wonderful year - a free pattern and instructions to make a (fake) Fur Collar.

This is a one-size detachable collar to add a touch of Winter glamour to your coats and cardis. It'd make a gorgeous last-minute Christmas gift too! It can be sewn either by hand or on a sewing machine. The pattern is available below for instant download and prints on two sheets of A4 or Letter size paper.

I made mine using a deliciously silky soft snow leopard print fake fur that I found in the remnant bin at Simply Fabrics in Brixton. You could also try Fabric Mart, Minerva Crafts and My Fabric Place.


You will need:
Fake fur for the collar - 30cm / 12" length x 40cm / 16" width
Satin or lining fabric for the under-collar - 30cm / 12" length x 40cm / 16" width
Matching thread
Hook and eye

Tools:
Fabric scissors or craft knife and cutting mat
Pins
Sewing machine (optional)
Hand sewing needle
Printer and 2 sheets of A4 or Letter size paper
Paper scissors
Glue or tape


To prepare the pattern:

Download the pattern and open it on a PDF reader such as Adobe Reader (if you print the pattern directly from Google Drive, it may not print at full scale - not the end of the world but you may find the collar a little small). In the print settings, select “actual size” or “set scaling to 100%” or “turn off scaling” (depending on what options you're given) to print the pattern at full scale. When you've printed the pattern, measure the test square on the pattern to double check it's exactly 40mm.

Cut along one of the frame lines, glue or tape the two collar pieces together to create one piece, and cut it out. And it's ready to use!

How to make the collar:


1) Place the pattern on the wrong side (ie. back) of the fake fur fabric, checking that the pile of the fur is pointing towards the ends of the collar. Pin the pattern in place, draw around it with a pen or pencil, then cut it out this shape using fabric scissors or a craft knife. When cutting fur, use the tip of the scissors or knife to make shallow cuts – focus on cutting the backing and try to avoid trimming down the pile if you can. To avoid the pile getting caught in the sewing machine or creating excessive bulk under the seams, you can either carefully trim the outer edge of the pile (not the backing) or comb it towards the middle. By now you should have fluff everywhere!

2) Pin the pattern to the under-collar fabric and cut it out using fabric scissors (or a rotary cutter if you have one). Trim the under-collar down by 2mm all the way around the edges. Making the under-collar slightly smaller than the collar will entice the seam line to roll to the underside when stitched so it’s not visible when the collar is worn.

3) Place the under-collar on top of the collar so the right sides (outside of the fabric) are facing each other. Pin the raw edges together, smoothing the pile towards the collar as you pin. Leave an opening about 10cm / 4” in length at the centre of the inside edge – I like to mark each side of the opening with two pins to remind me to stop sewing here. It’ll probably look a little wibbly at this stage as the under-collar is pulling on the slightly larger collar fabric – rest assured it’ll be neater once it’s turned out.

4) Starting at one end of the opening, stitch the under-collar to the collar using a 15mm / 5/8” seam allowance, backtacking at either end and removing pins as you sew. If you’re sewing on a machine, Claire Shaeffer’s Fabric Sewing Guide recommends setting the stitch length to 2.5 – 3mm. This makes it easier to free any trapped fur from the line of stitching later. In any case it’s a good idea to test out the stitch length and tension on a scrap first. Take pauses as you sew to poke any stray pile towards the collar with a pin.

5) Trim the seam allowances down close to the seam line to reduce bulk when we turn the collar out. Don’t trim the seam allowances of the unstitched opening though.

6) Turn the collar right sides out by pulling the ends through the unstitched opening. Run your finger inside the collar along the seam line to neaten it. If any of the pile is trapped in the stitching line, you can pull it out using a comb or your fingers. Fold the seam allowances of the unstitched opening to the inside of the collar and pin. Slip stitch the opening by hand to close it.

7) Sew a hook and eye onto the inner corners of the collar by hand.

Et voilà! A gorgeous fake fur collar!


You should now have fur fluff all over the place! Your table, floor, clothes, hair... When you’re cleaning up, give your machine a clean too so the fur doesn’t clog it up.

If you make a (fake) Fur Collar of your own, I'd love to see! Leave a link below to your picture on Pinterest / Instagram / Flickr / your blog and I'll share it on Pinterest. I may feature some of the projects in a future post, so if you leave a link below I'll take that as permission to share your image. Can't wait to see!

['Sleigh Ride' by The Ronettes]

35 comments:

  1. great pattern and so easy to make. thanks i will make it

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  2. Ask a silly question: if I didn't want to use fake fur, would the dimensions work for other fabrics. I'm thinking velvet but would something less drapey be better?

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    1. Yes! Velvet would be lovely. The pattern will work fine, it's just that the instructions are written for fur. You might want to cut it on the fold and try adding interfacing if you're using a different fabric.

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  3. so cute and Merry Christmas to you

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  4. Thanks so much for this! I recently found a piece of fake fur in the remnant bin that has been sat around waiting for a project to be used in. Love that leopard print!

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    1. Yaay - I finally got around to making one! I've posted a picture HERE

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  5. Tilly - thank you and Merry Christmas! Hope you have a well deserved rest over the Christmas holidays after a hectic but productive year.

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  6. That's really sweet of you, looking forward to buying your book in the Spring. Thank you and merr Christmas xx

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  7. Wow! What a nice surprise! Thank you very much, so thoughtful of you, Merry Christmas and much continued sucess in the New Year!! xx

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  8. It's gorgeous, I can just imagine it paired with a red cardi or a black one it would look fabulous. I have to say do you ever stop, you always seam to work at full steam ahead! I hope you manage to get some time off over christmas and the new year- you deserve it :) x

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    1. Ooh yes, it'd look lovely against red or black. Or green!

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  9. Wonderful Tilly am thinking of which dresses/cardis I can wear this with and so easy even I will have a try - you are a marvel - thank you. Big Christmas hugs Tilly
    Dorothy
    :-)xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

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  10. Tilly you are a mind reader! I was planning to find a pattern for the exact same thing this weekend so thanks for saving me the trouble!
    Merry Christmas
    Jodie x

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  11. Really, really cute! I love this! Have been planning to make a faux fur collar, actually, since I saw one in a Japanese sewing magazine, but I'll have to give this a try!

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  12. Thank you for the lovely gift Tilly.
    A very Merry Christmas to you and a very Happy New Year
    xxxx

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  13. very cute collar, perfect to add a little fun to a jumper or cardigan!

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  14. Thanks Tilly! This is a lovely gift and I am thinking with glee of the leopard fleece bit I have lying around in my stash...

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  15. Absolutely adorable, what a cute way to dress up an outfit during the gloomy winter weather! Thanks for sharing, and happy holidays to you!

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  16. I never thought I'd say this... but I need a fake fur collar. Adorable - thanks for the tutorial!

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  17. This is ... perfection! Thanks for this post, I hope you don't mind that I will be pinning it to one of my boards! Happiest of Holidays!

    http://aredesignedlove.blogspot.com

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  18. Thanks for sharing this tutorial! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

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  19. Thank you so much for the fab pattern. I wear lots of cardi's so this will be very handy.

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  20. this is so cute!

    http://laurenslittleblogs.blogspot.co.uk/
    xx

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  21. Tres spooky! Just came across a large scrap of fake-fur fabric in my stash whilst hunting for something else :)

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  22. A great idea to wear some fake fur without being too much. I love fake fur right now, so the perfect project at the perfect time! Thanks for the inspiration.

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  23. It's lovely, if only I could find some fake fur around here!
    P.S. Here's a link to my Miette skirt: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/484348134896433729/
    or http://handmadebymaryall.blogspot.it/2013/12/my-miette-skirt.html
    May

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  24. I'm working on a blouse right now and this could come in handy. Thanks Tilly!

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  25. Thank you Tilly for this pattern so sweet and have made 3 already, the lady of which I added ribbon so it can be tied in a bow instead of hook and eyes.

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  26. Brilliant, thank you! And Merry Christmas! x

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  27. Hi Tilly! Thank you for the free pattern! Here's the link to my collar - I put ribbon on mine instead of a hook and eye! x

    http://www.pinterest.com/pin/255579347577837739/

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  28. Thanks for the fun tutorial, here is my version!
    http://abackwardsprogress.blogspot.ca/2014/01/tillys-faux-fur-collar.html

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  29. Thanks for the nice quick project:) I made up a collar in lovely cotton from my stash over Christmas (http://englishgirlathome.com/2014/01/11/detachable-tilly-collar/).

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  30. Thanks for this lovely tutorial, my version is here -
    http://bakesnmakes.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/tillys-fake-fur-collar.html

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